Nina’s Blog

Therapeutic PEMFs and Sleep

One of the almost universal phenomena according to Dr. Pawluk, in people using PEMFs, regardless of PEMF system, is that people almost universally describe improvement in sleep. Because of this feedback, I felt it was important to dedicate an update to the subject.

Studies of brainwave electrical activity recordings have found different stages of sleep, with there being 2 primary stages: rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM). These stages are different in intensity and frequency of the brainwave activity. NREM sleep makes up about 80% of total sleep time in the adult. The most critical and restorative part of NREM sleep occurs during slow wave sleep (SWS). Most SWS occurs early at night, usually in the first 3 hours of sleep. SWS is the deepest, most difficult to interrupt, and most refreshing of the sleep stages. This time is also called Delta sleep, the time in which the brainwave patterns are in the lowest frequencies, typically between 1 – 4 Hz.

Stresses, whether physiologic or emotional, can affect circadian rhythms. Research done in Germany in the 1960’s through the 1970’s, in a deep bunker, deprived test subjects of external stimuli such as temperature, humidity, light, sound and even the natural magnetic field of the earth. These individuals ended up having disturbed circadian rhythms. They found that weak square wave 10 Hz electromagnetic fields reversed the effects of these disturbed circadian rhythms.

PEMF therapy jump starts the healing process in the body at the cellular level. It is used for treating: acute and chronic pain, depression, anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, as well as accelerating the healing time of injuries, increasing energy, sleep disorders, fatigue and it is an excellent anti-aging strategy.

PEMF therapy is natural and safe for individuals of all ages, including children, the elderly and even pets.

Read more Dr. Pawluk

Get Rid of Pain Now!

How the Body Heals Itself

Regeneration is one of the most remarkable of all cellular functions. In some animals, regenerative capabilities are incredible –a deer can regrow up to 60 pounds of antlers in as little as three months, and salamanders can regrow limbs that are as perfect as the originals they’ve lost. Humans, however, are much more complex beings, so our regeneration capabilities – though still impressive – are more limited.

The body heals itself in many ways – either somewhat rapidly in response to a disease, a wound, or loss of tissue, or slowly over time, as part of normal functioning. Regeneration refers to the regrowth of lost tissues, and happens in response to injury or disease. Wound healing refers to the closing up of an acute injury with scar tissue. While we know the skin readily regenerates or heals, other tissues have long been thought to have no regenerative capabilities. But as research and time progresses, we are learning more and more that most all cell types can be stimulated to repair, regenerate, and heal themselves.

Regeneration and wound healing require a great deal of cellular communication and adaptation to take place. In the case of eyes, for example, cells expand and eat up old matter daily. Bones are “new” every seven to ten years. Non-injured skin is completely replaced every two weeks or so. Cell turnover slows as we age, but never stops completely, continuing until death.

Basic regeneration (that which does not happen as a result of injury) is part of normal cell function. Cells are always dividing, growing, and eating up their older or injured neighbors (this is called autophagy). This does not require any outside stimulation, although such stimulation can enhance and ease the process. Injury-induced regeneration and wound healing require significantly more energy and adaptation.

Whether or not it is as a response to injury, the process of cell regeneration is the same: a cell’s contents must be copied. DNA is made up of two strands, each able to serve as a template for a new strand. DNA synthesis or replication requires existing proteins to split and reassemble. RNA messengers help with the transfer of genetic information from the existing cell to the nucleus of the newly formed cell. This process requires electrical energy.

Since magnetic fields interact with and increase natural electrical charges, PEMF therapy can assist with this information transfer. These benefits of PEMF therapy are frequently seen with wound healing and often with tissue regeneration.

Dr. Pawluk

Science-Backed Health Benefits of PEMF Therapy

To have healthy cells, you have to undergo an active, regular process – tune up your cells, which will slow aging and reduce the risk of cell dysfunction.

After all, as long as our cells are healthy, our bodies are healthy.

Even if cell dysfunction is imperceptible to the naked eye, it can lead to disease — if it’s not corrected on time.

By utilizing pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) every day, you can fine-tune your health in just minutes.

Once symptoms of a known disease or condition are detected, PEMF treatments can often help cells rebalance dysfunction faster (whether they’re applied alone or along with other therapies).

Numerous benefits of PEMF therapy have been manifested through more than 2,000 medical studies (which were conducted all around the world with several different PEMF therapy devices).

The positive effects of PEMF were well-established by the mid-20th century.

They were used for experimentation in healing and cellular wellness.

They were sold to both doctors (as medical devices) and consumers (as therapeutic devices).

The first high-power PEMF therapy devices appeared on the market in the 1970s.

They were used to improve the health of muscles, tendons, nerves, ligaments, and cartilage.

And they reduced pain and cellular regeneration.

Many countries around the world have accepted medical PEMF therapy devices.

  • In the US, the FDA has approved the use of PEMF therapy for treating non-union bone fractures (in 1979), muscle stimulation and urinary incontinence (in 1998), and anxiety and depression (in 2006).
  • Canada has accepted PEMF devices for several uses.
  • Israel has accepted PEMF devices for migraine headaches.
  • The EU has accepted the use of PEMF therapy to aid in recovery (from degeneration and trauma) and treat a range of motion issues.
  • PEMF therapy devices have been mostly used in Switzerland, Germany, and Austria to treat cancer. High-power PEMF therapy devices (such as PMT120 and PAP IMI) have been successfully used to overcharge malignant tumor cells and induce apoptosis.  more information on http://www.well-beingsecrets.com/pemf-therapy-benefits/